meet joy

I help businesses, non-profits, and entrepreneurs like you forge strong long-lasting connections with your target audience.

 

I base my practice on three core principles:

all marketing and communications are, at their core, human to human

effective marketing doesn’t need to tear people down to get them to buy your product or service

what goes around comes around (so spread love and kindness with abandon)

I believe everything can be better, and I’m the one you call when you’re tired of talking and ready to start doing.

 

If you want something done, get me on the case.


MY STORY

(It’s rather like a 3-act play… at least so far.)

ACT 1

In 1998, I began my career as a professional writer, putting together hardware and software manuals, training classes, and other reference materials for an I.T. company and later for a moving company. I created, developed, and delivered training to all of the employees of an 8-office division of Allied Van Lines on a new I.T. network and custom software.

They had been using UNIX-based computers – think black screen with orange text, no mouse, everything done via combinations of key-strokes – and I taught them how to use a mouse, navigate a WYSIWYG system, and use the new software our team had developed.

I loved every minute of it – figuring out how to convey such foreign concepts as drag-and-drop, connecting with people, watching them master something new, and seeing the team succeed.


ACT 2

In 2000, I had my first child (read the story on my blog). Though I originally planned to return to work after Elli was born, when she was 3 days old we discovered she had an incredibly dangerous set of heart defects. We found ourselves plunged into the terrifying world of cardiac intensive care.

Elli survived a cardiac arrest and open heart surgery, eventually coming home from the hospital almost 3 months later. When her medical team began talking about when we would take Elli home, not if we would, I chose to leave my career behind and focus completely on taking care of this vulnerable and fragile infant.

In spite of all of sleepless nights, hospital stays, specialists, and medical paperwork, I never stopped writing. In fact, my background in making complex things simple has turned out to be invaluable in every part of my life.

We wrote daily and then weekly email updates on our daughter’s progress (or lack of it). We designed medicine schedules and checklists, wrote instructions for formula and feeding tubes, and created detailed notes for those friends and relatives brave enough to babysit. We documented everything.

Meanwhile, I kept a foot in my field. My husband and I designed and published newsletters for nonprofits. I taught an online writing class for my alma mater. In 2005, I started a personal blog to share some of our stories and taught myself how to use Facebook and Twitter to connect with others.

In 2006, our children’s hospital recruited me to lead their Family Advisory Council (FAC) and support their efforts to improve the patient and family experience. I partnered with senior leadership, healthcare providers, researchers, and the board of trustees to navigate their transition to electronic medical records, various expansion projects, and the ever-growing diversity of patients visiting their facilities. The FAC and I were recognized for leading the nation in family-centered care, and I often advised staff from other hospitals looking to replicate our model in their institutions.


ACT 3

Elli passed away in 2008. We’ve lived through what most people agree is the worst thing a parent can face. (I’m not sure I agree – your hard is hard, but that’s beside the point.) We miss her every day. We are changed people because Elli was part of our family.

I believe nothing is wasted.

The years I spent at my daughter’s side led to volunteer work at the hospital. This led to five years gaining experience bringing people from vastly-different backgrounds and influence together to solve problems in the healthcare system. I learned how to facilitate for consensus and for spectrum, the place of strategic planning within the larger context of business, how to work with senior leaders, government officials, and experts, and how to get evereyone to listen to the “little guy” – patients and families without all the letters after their names, long white coats, and corner offices.

Today, I’ve expanded my focus from healthcare to both nonprofit and for-profit businesses. The 8 years we had with her strengthened me and expanded my perspective in countless and priceless ways. Every step of this journey has informed, shaped, and deepened the base of wisdom I draw from in my consulting work today.

One of my clients said to me the other day, “You’re the marketer with heart.” I think that’s a fantastic legacy, and one I will continue to try to live up to.

Review my detailed work history on my LinkedIn page. You can see samples of my work and a list of former and current clients here.

ACT 1

In 1998, I began my career as a professional writer, putting together hardware and software manuals, training classes, and other reference materials for an I.T. company and later for a moving company. I created, developed, and delivered training to all of the employees of an 8-office division of Allied Van Lines on a new I.T. network and custom software.

They had been using UNIX-based computers – think black screen with orange text, no mouse, everything done via combinations of key-strokes – and I taught them how to use a mouse, navigate a WYSIWYG system, and use the new software our team had developed.

I loved every minute of it – figuring out how to convey such foreign concepts as drag-and-drop, connecting with people, watching them master something new, and seeing the team succeed.

ACT 2

In 2000, I had my first child (read the story on my blog). Though I originally planned to return to work after Elli was born, when she was 3 days old we discovered she had an incredibly dangerous set of heart defects. We found ourselves plunged into the terrifying world of cardiac intensive care.

Elli survived a cardiac arrest and open heart surgery, eventually coming home from the hospital almost 3 months later. When her medical team began talking about when we would take Elli home, not if we would, I chose to leave my career behind and focus completely on taking care of this vulnerable and fragile infant.

In spite of all of sleepless nights, hospital stays, specialists, and medical paperwork, I never stopped writing. In fact, my background in making complex things simple has turned out to be invaluable in every part of my life.

We wrote daily and then weekly email updates on our daughter’s progress (or lack of it). We designed medicine schedules and checklists, wrote instructions for formula and feeding tubes, and created detailed notes for those friends and relatives brave enough to babysit. We documented everything.

Meanwhile, I kept a foot in my field. My husband and I designed and published newsletters for nonprofits. I taught an online writing class for my alma mater. In 2005, I started a personal blog to share some of our stories and taught myself how to use Facebook and Twitter to connect with others.

In 2006, our children’s hospital recruited me to lead their Family Advisory Council (FAC) and support their efforts to improve the patient and family experience. I partnered with senior leadership, healthcare providers, researchers, and the board of trustees to navigate their transition to electronic medical records, various expansion projects, and the ever-growing diversity of patients visiting their facilities. The FAC and I were recognized for leading the nation in family-centered care, and I often advised staff from other hospitals looking to replicate our model in their institutions.

ACT 3

Elli passed away in 2008. We’ve lived through what most people agree is the worst thing a parent can face. (I’m not sure I agree – your hard is hard, but that’s beside the point.) We miss her every day. We are changed people because Elli was part of our family.

I believe nothing is wasted.

The years I spent at my daughter’s side led to volunteer work at the hospital. This led to five years gaining experience bringing people from vastly-different backgrounds and influence together to solve problems in the healthcare system. I learned how to facilitate for consensus and for spectrum, the place of strategic planning within the larger context of business, how to work with senior leaders, government officials, and experts, and how to get evereyone to listen to the “little guy” – patients and families without all the letters after their names, long white coats, and corner offices.

Today, I’ve expanded my focus from healthcare to both nonprofit and for-profit businesses. The 8 years we had with her strengthened me and expanded my perspective in countless and priceless ways. Every step of this journey has informed, shaped, and deepened the base of wisdom I draw from in my consulting work today.

One of my clients said to me the other day, “You’re the marketer with heart.” I think that’s a fantastic legacy, and one I will continue to try to live up to.

Review my detailed work history on my LinkedIn page. You can see samples of my work and a list of former and current clients here.